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 Phantom: Love Never Dies

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Lady Orihime
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PostSubject: Phantom: Love Never Dies   Tue Aug 25, 2009 8:46 pm

I can't believe it's happening! And with Sierra Boggess and Ramin Karimloo!

I'm one of the very few who actually liked "The Phantom of Manhattan", so I'm so excited to see it finally brought to life. I just hope this means that POTO will be taken off Broadway :32:

Anyone else counting down the days until the premiere?

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PostSubject: Re: Phantom: Love Never Dies   Thu Aug 27, 2009 10:08 pm

Wait, what? They're doing a sequel? This is interesting! I just managed to see Phantom for the first time live last week. This is by far my favorite musical. I look forward to hearing more news about the continuation of the story of Ms. Daae.
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PostSubject: Re: Phantom: Love Never Dies   Tue Mar 30, 2010 5:17 am

It opened earlier this month...to mixed reviews. I've read the plot, and oh GOD! I am so disappointed!

Raoul, now a drunken gambler?
Christine sleeping with the Phantom the night before her wedding, and then planning on abandoning Raoul for him?
MEG GIRY BEING FORCED TO BE A PROSTITUTE AND KILLING CHRISTINE?!?

NONE of this BS was in Frederick Forsyth's book "The Phantom of Manhattan". As a fan of the book, I am appalled. Even people who ARE NOT phans of the book are appalled! What does that tell you?

Here is how it ended in the book:

Quote :
What happened next was so fast that I have to slow the action down to describe it to you.

Pierre called to his mother, "Maman, can we got home now?" She turned towards him with her brilliant smile, opened her arms to him, and said "Oui, cheri." He began to run. The figure in the bushes rose, extended his arm and followed the running boy with what turned out to be a navy Colt. That was when I shouted, but my cry was drowned by a much louder noise.

The boy reached his mother and passed into her embrace. But to avoid being knocked off her feet by his weight, she swept him into her arms and turned, as a parent will do. My shout of the warning and the crash of the Colt came together. I saw the lovely young woman shudder as if she had been punched in the back, which in fact she had, for, in turning, she had stopped the bullet intended for her son.

The man in the mask whirled towards the gunshot, saw the figure amid the bushes, pulled something from beneath his cloak, extended his arm and fired. I heard the crack of the tiny Derringer with its single bullet, but one was enough. Ten yards from me the assassin threw both hands to his face. When he fell he crashed out of the bushes onto the snow and lay face upward in the frosty dawn, a single hole showing black in the center of his forehead.

I was rooted to my spot behind the hedge. I could not move. I thank Providence there was nothing I could do anyway. What I could have done earlier, I was too late to do now, for I had seen and heard so much and understood so little.

At the second gunshot the boy, still uncomprehending, released his mother, who sank to her knees. There was a red stain already spreading on her back. The soft leaden slug had not penetrated her to hit the son in her arms, but had remained inside her. The Vicomte gave a cry of "Christine" and ran forward to take her into his arms. She leaned back in his embrace looked up at him and smiled.

Father Kilfoyle was on his knees in the snow beside her. He ripped off the broad sash around his waist, kissed both ends of it and draped it around his neck. He was praying, rapidly and urgently, tears streaming down his rugged Irish face. The man in the mask dropped the small pistol in the snow and stood like a statue, head bowed. His shoulders heaved silently as he wept.

The boy Pierre alone seemed at first unable to take in what had happened. One second his mother was embracing him, the next she was dying in front of his eyes. The first time he called “Maman” it was like a question. The second and third time, like a piteous cry. Then, as if seeking explanation, he turned to the vicomte. “Papa?” he asked.

Christine de Chagny opened her eyes and her gaze found Pierre. She spoke for the last time, quite clearly, before that divine voice was silenced forever. She said, “Pierre, this is not really Papa. He has brought you up as his own, but your true father is there.” She nodded towards the bowed figure in the mask. “I am sorry, my darling.”

Then she died. I will not make a big production out of it. She just died. Her eyes closed, the last breath rattled out of her and her head tilted sideways onto the chest of her husband. There was complete silence for several seconds, which seemed like an age. The boy looked from one man to the other. Then he asked of the vicomte once more, “Papa?”

Now, over the past few days I had come to think of the French aristocrat as a kind and decent man but somewhat ineffectual, compared, say, to the dynamic priest. But now something seemed to come into him.

The body of his dead wife lay cradled in the crook of his left arm. With his right hand he sought one of hers and slowly removed from it a golden ring. I recalled the closing scene at the opera, when the soldier with the shattered face had given her back that very ring as a sign that he accepted their love could never be. The French vicomte took the ring from her finger and pressed it into the palm of his devastated stepson.

A yard away Father Kilfoyle remained on his knees. He had given the diva final absolution before death and, his duty done, he prayed for her immortal soul.

Vicomte de Chagny scooped his dead wife up in his arms and rose to his feet. Then the man who had brought up another’s son as his own spoke in his halting English.
“It is true, Pierre. Maman was right. I have done everything for you that I could, but I was never your natural father. The ring belongs to him, who is your father in God’s eyes. Give it back to him. He loved her too, and in a way I never could.
I am going back to take the only woman I have ever loved back to lie her in the soil of France. Today, here, this hour, you have ceased to be a boy and become a man. Now you much make your choice.”

He stood there, his wife in his arms, waiting for an answer. Pierre turned and stared long at the figure of the man identified as his blood father.

The man I had come to call simply the Phantom of Manhattan stood alone with his head bowed, the very distance that separated him from others seeming to represent the distance to which the human race had pushed him. The hermit, the eternal outsider who had once thought that he had some chance of acceptance into human joys and had been rebuffed. Now every line of his body told me he had once lost everything he ever cared for and was going to lose it all again.

There was silence for several seconds as the boy stared across the clearing. In front of me was what the French call a tableau vivant. Six figures, two of them dead and four in pain.

The French vicomte was on one knee cradling the torso of his dead wife. He had laid his cheek on the top of her head which lolled against his chest, stroking the dark hair as if to comfort her.

The Phantom stood motionless, head still bowed, utterly defeated. Darius lay a few feet from me, open-eyed, starring up at the winter sky he could no longer see. The boy stood next to his stepfather, everything he had ever believe in and held to be the immutable order now torn to pieces in violence and bewilderment.

The priest was still on his knees, face turned upwards, eyes closed, but I noticed the big hard hands clutching his metal cross and the lips moving in silent prayer. Later, still consumed by my own inability to explain what happened next, I visited him at his home in the slums of the Lower East Side. What he told me I still do not really understand, but I relate it to you.

He said that in the noiseless clearing he could hear silent screams. He could hear the keening grief of the quiet Frenchman a few feet away. He could hear the bewildered pain of the boy whom he had tutored for seven years. But over all this, he said, he could hear something else. There was in that clearing a lost soul, crying in agony like Coleridge’s wandering albatross, planning alone through a sky of pain above an ocean of despair. He was praying that this lost soul might find safe haven in the love of God again. He was praying for a miracle which could not possibly happen. Look, I was a brash Jewish kid from the Bronx. What did I know of lost souls, redemption and miracles? I can only tell you what I saw.

Pierre slowly walked across the clearing towards him. He lifted a hand and removed the wide-brimmed hat. I thought the man in the mask uttered a low whimper. For the skull was bald, save for a few tufts of sparse hair, and the skin was blotched with livid scars and ribbed like molten wax. Without a word the boy eased away the mask of the face.

Now, I have seen the bodies on the slabs at Bellevue, some of them many days in the Hudson River; I have seen men killed on the fields of Europe. But I have never seen a face like the one exposed behind the mask. Only a part of the lower jaw on one side, and the eyes from which tears flowed down the ravaged cheeks seemed human in a visage otherwise so disfigured as to remain hardly human. I could at last understand why he wore his mask, and hid himself from mankind and all our society. Yet here he stood, exposed and humiliated in front of us all, and at the hand of a boy who was his own son.

Pierre stared up at the terrible face without visible shock or revulsion for a long time. Then he dropped the mask from his right hand. He took the left hand of his father and placed the golden ring upon the fourth finger.

Then he reached up with both hands, embraced the weeping man and said quite clearly, “I was to stay here with you, Father.”

Some back-up notes:

Darius wanted to kill Pierre because he knew he would lose his inheritance of the company he helped the Phantom make once he died. Everything would go to Pierre.

In the book, this is Christine’s excuse for why she had a child with the Phantom:

Quote :
That last evening, in the darkness by the lake far beneath the Opera I was so afraid I thought I would die of fear. I was half swooning when what happened…happened.

Christine never loved the Phantom in a romantic sense. She always loved Raoul, and even says that Raoul has loved both her and Pierre with every fiber in his being. He didn't become a drunken gambler, who threw hissy fits and bets on his marriage.

And the reason why Raoul couldn't have a kids is because he got shot. The damage caused by the bullet and it's removal had been terrible. Major blood vessels in the upper groin and lower stomach had been torn beyond repair.

ANYWAY, back to my mini-rant:


And WTF? Does ALW think his fans can't count? 1907 minus 1881 does NOT = 10 years

Dear God, PLEASE let them change these things before it comes to Broadway...it's going to be laughed off the Great White Way if it stays the same.

On a more positive note...the music, the orchestrations, are definitely beautiful! I love the score...but they lyrics are bad. Very bad.

Of course, anyone interested can judge for themselves here:

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PostSubject: Re: Phantom: Love Never Dies   Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:39 pm

Yeah, this was one of the sequels that made me feel like the creators were just milking its recent re-popularity for what it's worth.

I'm sorry to hear that even the lyrics were disappointing. "Phantom of the Opera's" score is really great.
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